Knowledge

Simultaneous diagnosis of five skin-related neglected tropical diseases (skin NTDs)

Simultaneous diagnosis of five skin-related neglected tropical diseases (skin NTDs)
  • Ghana Country
  • 3.416.717 € Investment
  • 2017-2022 Length

The Challenge

We have joined forces with American Leprosy Missions (ALM), Raoul Follereau Foundation (FRF) and Biomeme.

This research project seeks to develop a single PCR test that can diagnose five skin NTDs: Buruli ulcer, leprosy, mycetoma, leishmaniasis and yaws.

The solution

The purpose of this research project is to determine if Biomeme’s qPCR molecular diagnostic tool can effectively detect the pathogenic nucleic acids of five skin-related neglected tropical diseases in clinical and field settings.

Impact

An exceptional opportunity to collect scientific evidence on a potential improvement in the integrated diagnosis of five skin-related neglected tropical diseases, this research project is also a chance to improve the health of people living with these skin NTDs.

If successful and scientifically endorsed by the WHO, it could represent a major breakthrough in the fight against skin-related neglected tropical diseases (skin NTDs), contributing to the targets that the WHO has set in its new roadmap 2021-2030 to control, eliminate or eradicate these diseases.

Related projects

Learn about other projects where we fight Neglected Tropical Diseases

LRI: The International Alliance to end leprosy

LRI: The International Alliance to end leprosy

We have joined forces with the Leprosy Research Initiative (LRI), an international consortium to improve the diagnosis and research of leprosy and fund initiatives that contribute to these endeavours.

Support for three laboratories researching and detecting NTDs

Support for three laboratories researching and detecting NTDs

Medical research is also conducted in African laboratories. We carry forward work conducted by three of the main laboratories in Ghana that detect NTDs.

A clinical trial to reduce the treatment time for the Buruli ulcer by half

A clinical trial to reduce the treatment time for the Buruli ulcer by half

After decades combatting the Buruli ulcer, which affects thousands of people in over 33 countries, we are still unaware of its exact mode of transmission. We know it is related to environments with stagnant and unsafe water.

Strengthening the African network of laboratories for Buruli ulcer research

Strengthening the African network of laboratories for Buruli ulcer research

There are currently no unified protocols for detecting Buruli ulcer. Although the WHO sets guidelines for the control of NTDs, many laboratories in Africa do not have standardised protocols for sample collection and subsequent screening and diagnosis of these diseases.

What can you do?

Do you want to collaborate in our fight against neglected diseases?

Collaborate
Help us collaborate
Help us collaborate
Join and contribute